Thursday, February 11, 2016

Main Street Cinema- All for 25 Cents

The wonderful post painted with advertising outside of the Main Street Cinema at a time when the films shown were various silent films. The list of silent film stars is rather extensive, but I would be willing to bet that very few people would recognize the names of the stars. Now the Main Street Cinema shows various silent Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck shorts, although they still use all 6 screens. The cinema is a nice place to go for a little less crowd time.

4 comments:

Chuck said...

I recognize most of the names. Probably doesn't hurt that I majored in film at a school that featured the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Theater...

K. Martinez said...

I also recognize most of the names. Quite frankly, I find the Main Street Cinema a bore because they only show Mickey Mouse cartoons. I'm a huge fan of the "silents" and would find them much more interesting to watch than the cartoons that don't even match the era Main Street represents. Wonderful detailed sign today. Thanks.

Chuck said...

My first exposure to a complete silent short (other than family home movies) was "The Great Train Robbery" at WDW's Main Street Cinema when I was ten (looong before it became a plush shop). And I loved it. Sad to think that experience is gone now for any future generations.

Donald Benson said...

Vivid memories of the Disneyland version. This was one of the only chances I had to see silent movies, aside from the occasional Robert Youngson film ("When Comedy Was King", etc.) on television. By the 70s the local library had 8mm titles from Blackhawk Films, and silents were becoming more available via PBS (then NET) and college showings, but back then it was a major novelty.

One screen was devoted to intermission slides, mostly genuine vintage ones ("Don't Spit on the Floor! Remember the Jonestown Flood!") with antique-looking ads for Main Street businesses. They'd sometimes have a single reel of a drama like "Hunchback of Notre Dame" cycling over and over while the other screens showed complete short subjects.