Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Bead Workers Booth Indian Village

The Indian Village was not only scene to the Native American dances, but also had displays showing typical life and activities of the Native American tribes. One of the displays was for a bead weaver. I believe the weaver would be working and talking to guests at the same time, similar to the characters at Colonial Williamsburg or any other historical site. I wonder how many kids who went to Disneyland then went on to Anthropology or History careers after being exposed to the historical displays? How many scientists were influenced by the Monsanto displays (both the 1955 and the 1967 versions)? Now Disneyland has to have entertainment value instead of infotainment value. The California film in California Adventure is being removed to be replaced by a cartoon ride. At least Innoventions may be receiving a make over to make it more relevant.

7 comments:

Vintage Disneyland Tickets said...

WOW that’s a RARE shot! I'm with you on your premise of children becoming historians and scientists due to Disney's "Infotainment". Too bad today's children just get to sharpen their video game skills where there used to be inspiring displays and "Infotainment".

Major Pepperidge said...

My mom is bead crazy (I'm totally serious, you should see her zillions of ancient beads), so this will interest her for sure. I have NEVER even heard of this Disneyland detail, this is a great tidbit and a great photo!

Anonymous said...

O.o AAAAAA!!!!!! What's happening to Golden Dreams?! Is that where Little Mermaid is going?!

annie said...

This is a general comment, not post-specific. I am P.O.P. OBSESSED! I am an artist and currently in the process of creating a series of digital images and original work with P.O.P. as the theme. I invite you and all those who hold a special place in their hearts for the place to view my art at:

anniewildbear.etsy.com

thanks :)
--annie

Ryan said...

While you may think Infotainment is a good idea, Disney does not accurately depict history. Just look at Pocahontas! While I appreciate the sentiment, Disney's need to make things politically correct damages the historical value you hold so high.

Matterhorn1959 said...

Ryan- the infotainment I am missing is not Pocahantas or modern PC approved and presented by Disney. Rather it is the infotainment that presented a dead settler in front of a burning cabin, the science presented by Monsanto (Adventure Through Inner Space), the Main Street that was more true to life than what it is now with real stores, and even the geography shown in the Circle Vision theaters.

Also remember ones version of history is always distorted by modern thought and always swayed to one extent or antoher.

mr wiggins said...

> Too bad today's children just get to sharpen their video game skills where there used to be inspiring displays and "Infotainment". <

> ... it is the infotainment that presented a dead settler in front of a burning cabin, the science presented by Monsanto (Adventure Through Inner Space), the Main Street that was more true to life than what it is now with real stores, and even the geography shown in the Circle Vision theaters. <


Bingo. Great comments from both you guys, to a great series of posts from matterhorn! From the Indian Village to Tomorrowland, to the time-machine immersiveness of a Main Street with a real old-fashioned General Store, Pharmacy and a Nickelodeon playing real silent films, Disneyland's unique style of infotainment was part of the magic of the Park in those days. It inspired enormous numbers of us Baby Boomers. You can't underestimate the number of black light mineral displays that were built for science fairs by kids enthralled by Mineral Hall; or chemistry sets sold to kids who were turned on by the '55 Hall of Chemistry and the '67 Adventure thru Inner Space; or the number of kids who wound up with careers in animation after being bitten by the bug in the Art of Animation exhibit. It was Museum of Science and Industry stuff done Disney style -- which means presented with more flair and imagination than you could see anywhere else, by showmen who truly knew their stuff -- and was it ever exciting!